These Are The 10 Worst Places To Live In America


We used science and data to determine which cities in America are the real pits.

Join RoadSnacks
This article is an opinion based on facts and is meant as infotainment. Don’t freak out.

Swipe left for slideshow
Advertisement. Article Continues Below.

There’s a common denominator that all bad cities have.

They are the places that have bad economies. They are the places where the school systems are in bad shape. They’re the places where people are out of work, and where residents earn low salaries.

If home prices are low, it’s a sign that there’s not a lot of demand to live there.

And certainly, if crime is really high, no one wants to be there at all.

The cities below all share those qualities. There might be some surprises on this list, but when you look at the unbiased data, it’s hard to argue against. We had more than 10 million people read our worst cities in a state series, which was featured in hundreds of media outlets, including an NPR feature.

So we know what we’re talking about.

After analyzing the biggest 250 cities in the country, here is our list of the worst cities to live in America:

  1. Macon, Georgia
  2. Jackson, Mississippi
  3. Detroit, Michigan
  4. Knoxville, Tennessee
  5. Chattanooga, Tennessee
  6. Rockford, Illinois
  7. Savannah, Georgia
  8. Memphis, Tennessee
  9. Mobile, Alabama
  10. Springfield, Missouri

You might be surprised to see some of these cities on this list. We understand there’s a lot of good in every place. However, according to data (which doesn’t measure things like beauty, ‘friendly people’ and community involvement), there are far better options in America for making a place home.

The best place to live in America? Alexandria, Virginia. More on that later.

Advertisement. Article Continues Below.

How do you decide if a place is lousy or not?

In order to rank the worst places to live in America, we had to determine what criteria people like or dislike about a place. It isn’t a stretch to assume that people like low crime, solid education, things to do and a stable economy.

So we scraped the internet for those criteria, asked for the opposite of those, and it spit out the answer. Like magic.

How we crunched the numbers

We threw a lot of criteria at this one in order to get the best, most complete results possible. Using FBI crime data, the government census, Bureau of Labor Statistics and Sperling’s Best Places, this is the criteria we used:

  • Population Density (The lower the worse – meaning there’s less to do for indoor entertainment)
  • Highest Unemployment Rates
  • Adjusted Median Income (Median income adjusted for the cost of living)
  • High Housing Vacancy Rate
  • Education (Low expenditures per student and high Student Teacher Ratio)
  • High Crime

If you’d like to see the complete list of cities, scroll to the bottom of this post to see a link to the entire data set.

Note: We get the crime numbers from the FBI, which gets its crime numbers from the cities themselves. This list is based on data, and is entirely unbiased.

Advertisement. Article Continues Below.

1. Macon, Georgia

Grade: F

Wikipedia

Population: 91,604
Home values: 5th lowest in the nation
Crime: 10th highest in the nation
Median household income: $33,051

It was a little surprising when we got the results back, but when you look at the data, it’s hard to argue against. Macon is by far the worst place to live in the United States. Here’s why.

You can try and make an argument that ‘cheap living’ is a good thing, and it’s a valid point. But, the fact is, that homes are priced by demand, and there’s simply not a lot of demand to live in Macon, Georgia. The average home price is only $54,300. And there’s only 4 other cities where homes are cheaper.

Would you have thought that Macon was the 10th most dangerous place in the country? According to the FBI numbers, every year you’re within Macon city limits, you have a 1 in 13 chance of being the victim of a property crime. That’s a lot of home break ins, stolen cell phones and car burglaries.

There were 18 murders in Macon two years ago as well.

The rest of the numbers were also far below average, including what families earn each year in combined income.

The fact is, Macon gets an F when it comes to livability, when you take into account the desirable factors people say they want in a home town.

2. Jackson, Mississippi

Grade: D-

Flickr user Ken Lund.

Population: 174,382
Crime: 6th worst in the nation
Home values: 30th lowest in the U.S.

We’re going to be seeing a lot of cities in the south on this list. In fact, 7 of the worst 10 places to live in America are in the south.

Jackson has a really high crime rate. It’s so high, only 5 other cities are more dangerous in America. There were 50 murders in Jackson two years ago. That’s amazingly high. Plus, you have a 1 in 17 chance of being robbed here every year.

At $95,000, home prices are some of the lowest in the nation.

Mississippi as a state has some major issues with crime and its economy. It actually ranked as the worst state in America to live in that we released earlier this summer.

3. Detroit, Michigan

Grade: D-

Flickr user James.

Population: 721,459
Unemployment rate: Worst in the nation
Home values: Lowest in the nation
Crime: 7th highest in the U.S.

Detroit has been the focus of the media for a decade now. We’re all aware of how this city has fallen quickly from grace, and only those who live in the Detroit area truly know how bad it really is.

What kept Detroit from ranking as the worst city in America is the ‘decent’ public school system that it has in place. While the student-teacher ratio is high in Detroit public schools, they do have a lot of money to spread around, so the kids get as many opportunities as they want to succeed.

The problem is, many of the kids in Detroit simply don’t care. And the adults are having trouble making ends meet.

  The 10 Cities In America With The Most Suicidal Tendencies

The unemployment rate here is 14.5%, which is by far the highest in the nation, and more than double the national average. And anyone with a pulse can buy a home in Detroit; at $35,000 apiece, it really is amazing how cheap it is to live here.

And of course, crime in Detroit is horrible. You have a 1 in 17 chance of being the victim of a robbery every year, and a 1 in 48 chance of being killed, raped or attacked.

There were 40,800 robberies within Detroit two years ago, and a staggering 316 murders. So basically, it’s a good day when someone isn’t killed in Detroit.

4. Knoxville, Tennessee

Grade: D-

Wikipedia.

Population: 179,973
Public school spending: 6th lowest in America
Crime: 18th worst in the U.S.

You might be really shocked to see Knoxville here, but the data doesn’t lie. In fact, there are three Tennessee cities on this list.

Which makes sense, because in our worst states in America research, Tennessee was 4th.

What’s wrong with Knoxville? First off, the numbers in Knoxville are all far below average, so as a whole, it’s really lousy here. What stands out is the bottom of the barrel spending levels that Knoxville public school kids get every year and the high crime.

The average kid in America gets $14,000 a year in spending from the state. In Knoxville, it’s $8,258. That’s not a good sign.

And you may not know it, but the crime in Knoxville is sky high. There aren’t too many other cities in America that are more dangerous; you have a 1 in 16 chance of being robbed in Knoxville every year. Tennessee as a whole is one of the most dangerous in the nation, but that’s really high even for them.

The average family in Knoxville brings in $40,000 a year, which is far below the national average.

5. Chattanooga, Tennessee

Grade: D

Wikipedia

Population: 167,869
Crime: 29th worst
Student spending: 14th lowest

Only a 90 minute drive south of Knoxville is Chattanooga, where you see the same issues above. Crime is really high, schools are poorly funded, and home prices are some of the lowest in the nation.

The average family brings in just over $42,000 a year after a cost of living adjustment. While that’s certainly nowhere near the poverty level, most Chattanooga residents certainly aren’t ‘getting ahead.’

6. Rockford, Illinois

Grade: D

Wikipedia

Population: 150,000
Unemployment rate: 11th highest in the nation
Home values: 10th lowest
Crime: 15th highest in the nation

You might be thinking Rockford? We understand. When you look at the numbers, Rockford has some serious issues, though.

About 90 minutes due west of Chicago, this mid-size city has the triple layered mess on its hands. The unemployment rate is 10.2%, which is just about as high as you’ll see in this country. That might be part of the reason that homes are only selling for an average of $75,500 each. Rockford isn’t a small city, and that’s really low for the 3rd largest city in the state.

Crime is exceptionally high here. People think Chicago is really dangerous, and in some parts of it, sure, it’s off the charts. But Rockford is far more dangerous, per capita. Rockford saw 19 murders two years ago, and you have a 1 in 20 chance of being robbed within Rockford city limits each year.

7. Savannah, Georgia

Grade: D

Wikipedia

Population: 137,690
Crime: 16th highest in the nation
Home values: 27th lowest

Savannah has a stellar reputation among travelers and people who live in the south. It’s an historic town, there’s a lot of tradition, and culture, and everyone’s nice.

But remember, science doesn’t measure those things. It measures facts, and the fact is, Savannah is a lousy place to live permanently.

Some of the crime might be attributed to the fact that Savannah is a tourist destination, so certain elements of the crime might be targeted towards visitors. Still, is that a place you’d want to live? Where every year that you’re within city limits, you have a 1 in 30 chance of being robbed yourself?

Home values here might be considered a steal, but trust us, when home prices are low out in the country, that’s partly because land is cheaper. When home prices are low in a big city with a great reputation, there is a reason.

Other factors that hurt Savannah: A high unemployment rate and low household incomes.

8. Memphis, Tennessee

Grade: D

Wikipedia.

Population: 651,050
Crime: 4th worst in the nation
Home values: 9th lowest in the nation

Poor Tennessee. Its largest city is also a really lousy place to live. (If you’re curious, Nashville ranked as the 54th worst place to live in the U.S.)

Memphis is hurt by some of the same issues we’ve seen over and over again on this list: High crime and cheap homes. Memphis is the 4th most dangerous place in the nation, where you have a 1 in 16 chance of being robbed each year. In fact, there were almost as many robberies and thefts in Memphis as there were in Detroit last year.

The only difference: There were half as many murders in Memphis as in Detroit. But how does 124 needless murders in 2013 sound to you? A place you’d want to live?

Memphis has a really bad local economy as well. It’s a place where unemployment is high, people are broke, and homes are cheap.

9. Mobile, Alabama

Grade: D+

Flickr user Jordi Escuer.

Population: 195,239
Home values: 19th lowest in the U.S.
Unemployment rate: 53rd highest
School spending: 37th lowest in the nation

Mobile doesn’t really stand out with any one category being horrible , but it is far, far below the average in just about all of them.

Home values are hovering around $85,000 each, with is really low for a city of nearly 200,000. The unemployment rate is high, but not out of this world. Schools are underfunded, but not broke. And it’s dangerous here, but there aren’t murders every night.

There are just far, far better places to make your home, according to the data.

  These Are The 10 Most Dangerous States In America

10. Springfield, Missouri

Grade: D+

Wikipedia

Population: 160,246
Crime: 3rd worst in the nation
School spending: 25th lowest

Springfield is a worse place to live than St. Louis? How does that make sense? Let’s look.

While St. Louis has the worst crime rate in the nation, Springfield is right there behind them. In fact, Springfield is more dangerous than Detroit, when you factor in robberies. Sure, Springfield only saw 12 murders in 2013, but anyone within its city limits has a 1 in 11 chance of being robbed each year.

Chances are if you’ve lived in Springfield your whole life, you’ve been robbed multiple times.

Additional factors that plague Springfield are severely underfunded schools, really low household incomes, and really cheap homes.

The next 20

Here are the grades for the next 20 cities on the list. The complete scoring chart is at the bottom.

    11. San Bernardino, CA. Grade: D+
    12. Brownsville, TX. Grade: D+
    13. Birmingham, AL. Grade: D+
    14. Tucson, AZ. Grade: D+
    15. Columbus, GA. Grade: C-
    16. Daytyon, OH. Grade: C-
    17. Lansing, MI. Grade: C-
    18. Kansas City, KS. Grade: C-
    19. Cleveland, OH. Grade: C-
    20. Victorville, CA. Grade: C-

There You Have It

If you’re looking at cities in the U.S. where crime is high, people are broke, and the public schools are lousy, this is an accurate list.

Mobile users: Here’s a link to the complete data chart. It also has a tab for the best cities in America.

If you’re also curious enough, here are the best cities in America, according to science.

  1. Alexandria, VA (Pop. 140,337)
  2. Plano, TX (Pop. 263,122)
  3. Frisco, TX (Pop. 116,944)
  4. Naperville, IL (Pop. 142,143)
  5. Bellevue, WA (Pop. 122,878)

We also wrote a story on the dumbest cities in America to live. Click here to read that one.

Disclaimer: This article is an opinion based on data. It should not be taken as fact.

Detailed Chart of the Worst Cities to live in America

City Rank Population Home Values Unemployment Rate
Macon, Georgia 1 91,604 $54,300 8.8%
Jackson, Mississippi 2 174,382 $95,000 6.5%
Detroit, Michigan 3 721,459 $35,700 14.5%
Knoxville, Tennessee 4 179,973 $109,200 5.6%
Chattanooga, Tennessee 5 167,869 $109,700 6.3%
Rockford, Illinois 6 152,948 $75,500 10.2%
Savannah, Georgia 7 137,690 $93,700 7.1%
Memphis, Tennessee 8 651,050 $65,800 7.9%
Mobile, Alabama 9 195,239 $85,600 7.5%
Springfield, Missouri 10 160,246 $105,100 5.0%
San Bernardino, California 11 210,624 $138,200 11.3%
Brownsville, Texas 12 175,210 $78,200 8.6%
Birmingham, Alabama 13 213,180 $87,400 7.3%
Tucson, Arizona 14 521,695 $126,300 5.9%
Columbus, Georgia 15 191,278 $84,900 7.4%
Dayton, Ohio 16 142,670 $45,000 6.3%
Lansing, Michigan 17 114,537 $76,600 8.4%
Kansas City, Kansas 18 145,605 $85,900 6.7%
Cleveland, Ohio 19 397,972 $50,300 8.5%
Victorville, California 20 115,069 $121,500 10.1%
Stockton, California 21 292,262 $167,800 14.2%
Tallahassee, Florida 22 181,821 $145,900 5.1%
Toledo, Ohio 23 287,487 $53,400 6.2%
St. Louis, Missouri 24 318,527 $98,400 8.2%
Montgomery, Alabama 25 205,516 $118,700 6.6%
Gainesville, Florida 26 124,981 $127,900 4.3%
Orlando, Florida 27 240,185 $117,800 5.2%
Kansas City, Missouri 28 459,772 $132,300 6.7%
Fresno, California 29 495,777 $159,500 11.4%
Tulsa, Oklahoma 30 391,486 $94,300 4.0%
Fayetteville, North Carolina 31 200,439 $104,300 5.1%
Akron, Ohio 32 199,955 $60,200 5.6%
Wilmington, North Carolina 33 107,116 $154,200 5.3%
Jacksonville, Florida 34 823,652 $111,900 5.9%
Rochester, New York 35 210,967 $58,900 7.4%
Waco, Texas 36 124,843 $89,800 4.7%
Springfield, Massachusetts 37 153,278 $123,000 8.9%
Salt Lake City, Utah 37 186,740 $263,100 2.9%
Beaumont, Texas 39 117,769 $80,900 6.8%
Clarksville, Tennessee 40 133,583 $129,200 6.0%
Greensboro, North Carolina 41 270,619 $104,700 5.8%
Columbia, South Carolina 42 129,757 $162,300 5.5%
Oakland, California 43 392,890 $420,300 8.9%
Hartford, Connecticut 44 124,879 $155,500 12.4%
Shreveport, Louisiana 45 200,099 $89,700 5.2%
Milwaukee, Wisconsin 46 594,328 $90,100 8.4%
Lancaster, California 47 155,496 $166,200 10.9%
Peoria, Illinois 48 114,754 $82,900 7.8%
Independence, Missouri 49 116,513 $102,300 6.4%
Cincinnati, Ohio 50 297,314 $90,900 5.2%
Buffalo, New York 51 261,955 $54,600 7.2%
Atlanta, Georgia 52 425,931 $137,000 8.5%
New Haven, Connecticut 52 129,898 $165,600 9.3%
Reno, Nevada 54 226,305 $188,600 7.1%
Spokane, Washington 55 208,701 $131,000 6.4%
Nashville, Tennessee 56 629,113 $188,400 4.7%
Springfield, Illinois 57 115,982 $111,000 5.9%
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 58 581,094 $130,600 3.8%
Bridgeport, Connecticut 58 144,446 $146,000 10.2%
Little Rock, Arkansas 60 193,691 $127,100 5.7%
Grand Rapids, Michigan 60 189,340 $103,500 6.8%
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 62 1,525,811 $103,400 6.8%
Miami Gardens, Florida 62 107,884 $127,300 6.6%
Palmdale, California 64 151,841 $178,700 9.5%
Killeen, Texas 65 127,995 $114,100 6.0%
Allentown, Pennsylvania 66 117,942 $95,100 7.3%
North Las Vegas, Nevada 67 215,762 $146,600 8.7%
Miami, Florida 68 401,927 $245,200 7.8%
Sacramento, California 69 467,467 $207,200 8.4%
Huntsville, Alabama 70 179,855 $157,900 5.5%
Syracuse, New York 71 144,703 $77,200 6.3%
Topeka, Kansas 72 127,312 $95,000 5.3%
Tampa, Florida 73 339,391 $123,000 6.0%
Evansville, Indiana 74 119,226 $89,200 5.5%
St. Petersburg, Florida 75 245,363 $120,100 5.7%
Modesto, California 76 201,986 $180,100 10.6%
Laredo, Texas 77 236,063 $109,500 4.9%
Phoenix, Arizona 78 1,462,368 $159,800 5.4%
Baltimore, Maryland 79 620,644 $93,700 7.8%
New Orleans, Louisiana 80 341,407 $170,700 5.1%
Tacoma, Washington 81 200,013 $176,600 6.7%
Bakersfield, California 81 347,091 $182,900 7.9%
Indianapolis, Indiana 83 831,230 $120,500 5.8%
Providence, Rhode Island 84 178,185 $137,000 9.5%
Ontario, California 85 165,260 $291,500 8.9%
Athens, Georgia 86 117,762 $161,600 5.2%
Vallejo, California 86 116,417 $216,800 8.7%
Visalia, California 86 123,905 $165,200 8.3%
El Paso, Texas 89 650,778 $117,300 6.0%
Abilene, Texas 90 118,484 $95,200 3.7%
Hialeah, Florida 91 226,837 $142,300 6.8%
Salinas, California 91 150,634 $282,900 13.2%
Port St. Lucie, Florida 93 163,748 $123,800 6.4%
Aurora, Colorado 94 326,249 $178,600 6.1%
Salem, Oregon 95 154,835 $162,800 7.1%
Warren, Michigan 96 134,550 $77,600 8.9%
Colorado Springs, Colorado 97 417,534 $189,900 7.0%
Las Vegas, Nevada 97 587,699 $160,200 7.6%
Eugene, Oregon 99 156,222 $214,400 5.6%
Riverside, California 100 306,128 $263,600 8.4%
Vancouver, Washington 100 162,699 $195,600 6.3%
Albuquerque, New Mexico 102 545,083 $179,400 5.6%
Dallas, Texas 103 1,207,202 $201,700 5.1%
Fort Wayne, Indiana 104 253,617 $98,500 5.4%
Louisville, Kentucky 105 741,285 $148,100 6.9%
Amarillo, Texas 106 191,118 $97,700 3.2%
Wichita, Kansas 107 381,176 $118,700 5.6%
Baton Rouge, Louisiana 108 229,174 $137,600 4.5%
Joliet, Illinois 108 147,098 $100,700 10.3%
Lubbock, Texas 110 229,428 $108,400 3.4%
Elizabeth, New Jersey 111 124,795 $166,000 9.2%
Fairfield, California 112 105,407 $278,500 7.7%
Richmond, Virginia 113 205,348 $133,800 5.7%
Moreno Valley, California 114 193,758 $207,700 9.7%
Pomona, California 115 149,431 $281,700 8.5%
Paterson, New Jersey 116 145,655 $198,800 12.3%
Mesa, Arizona 117 443,875 $172,800 5.1%
Newark, New Jersey 118 276,478 $226,100 10.2%
Inglewood, California 119 110,225 $328,500 9.6%
Mcallen, Texas 120 130,297 $114,500 5.4%
Murfreesboro, Tennessee 121 109,172 $147,800 4.4%
Surprise, Arizona 122 115,007 $181,500 6.3%
Norfolk, Virginia 123 243,056 $173,500 6.0%
Corpus Christi, Texas 124 305,427 $112,900 4.2%
Clearwater, Florida 125 108,138 $141,200 5.1%
Glendale, Arizona 126 229,331 $157,500 5.2%
Houston, Texas 127 2,107,449 $182,700 4.7%
Escondido, California 128 144,311 $352,600 6.3%
Lafayette, Louisiana 129 120,757 $156,200 3.3%
Charlotte, North Carolina 130 740,931 $141,400 5.3%
Elgin, Illinois 131 109,513 $134,900 8.9%
San Antonio, Texas 132 1,335,287 $154,300 4.3%
Gresham, Oregon 133 105,612 $214,900 6.3%
Santa Ana, California 134 326,608 $373,900 8.1%
Hayward, California 135 145,165 $381,100 6.4%
Columbia, Missouri 136 109,008 $156,900 3.8%
Cape Coral, Florida 136 155,405 $149,700 5.4%
El Monte, California 138 114,032 $370,400 9.5%
Fort Worth, Texas 139 743,865 $114,900 4.7%
Long Beach, California 140 463,589 $446,100 8.4%
Durham, North Carolina 141 229,963 $148,300 4.4%
Portland, Oregon 142 585,888 $283,200 6.0%
Los Angeles, California 143 3,804,503 $476,300 8.5%
Chicago, Illinois 144 2,702,471 $165,700 8.4%
Columbus, Ohio 145 790,168 $95,900 4.3%
Hollywood, Florida 146 142,060 $173,500 5.2%
Anaheim, California 147 337,471 $438,800 6.5%
Worcester, Massachusetts 148 181,473 $177,400 6.8%
Concord, California 148 122,683 $396,900 6.6%
Provo, Utah 150 113,105 $186,300 2.9%
Tempe, Arizona 151 164,139 $209,600 4.5%
Newport News, Virginia 152 180,831 $159,000 6.0%
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania 153 306,430 $76,700 4.8%
Fort Lauderdale, Florida 154 167,370 $240,500 4.5%
Peoria, Arizona 155 154,566 $202,500 5.0%
Anchorage, Alaska 156 291,470 $316,100 5.0%
Grand Prairie, Texas 157 174,631 $152,300 4.9%
Oxnard, California 158 197,456 $355,300 8.4%
Lakewood, Colorado 159 143,496 $247,100 5.5%
Pasadena, Texas 160 149,506 $101,700 5.3%
Berkeley, California 161 112,662 $819,300 5.5%
Henderson, Nevada 162 258,270 $207,400 7.0%
Garden Grove, California 163 171,377 $434,500 6.3%
Lowell, Massachusetts 163 106,739 $200,200 6.7%
Des Moines, Iowa 165 204,362 $103,100 4.8%
Fullerton, California 166 135,419 $518,200 5.6%
Fontana, California 167 196,129 $259,800 8.7%
Denver, Colorado 167 604,356 $251,600 5.8%
West Valley City, Utah 169 129,123 $162,700 3.5%
San Diego, California 170 1,308,619 $472,200 6.0%
Hampton, Virginia 171 137,471 $144,800 6.0%
Norman, Oklahoma 172 111,753 $130,900 2.9%
Roseville, California 172 119,537 $341,600 6.2%
Fort Collins, Colorado 174 144,329 $247,200 4.3%
Downey, California 175 111,807 $417,000 6.1%
Odessa, Texas 176 101,545 $171,300 2.8%
Santa Rosa, California 177 167,207 $392,800 5.2%
Oceanside, California 178 167,799 $378,700 5.7%
Chula Vista, California 179 242,499 $384,100 7.1%
Scottsdale, Arizona 180 219,867 $384,900 4.3%
New York, New York 180 8,199,221 $466,900 7.4%
Irving, Texas 182 217,021 $123,200 4.3%
Pasadena, California 183 137,316 $638,000 5.8%
Kent, Washington 184 108,700 $240,400 5.0%
Washington, District Of Columbia 185 605,759 $434,300 7.0%
Denton, Texas 186 115,098 $142,500 3.8%
Glendale, California 187 192,537 $609,900 6.6%
Aurora, Illinois 188 196,569 $133,500 7.3%
Garland, Texas 189 227,641 $109,200 5.1%
Raleigh, North Carolina 190 405,007 $179,400 4.3%
Minneapolis, Minnesota 191 385,023 $190,900 3.9%
Sioux Falls, South Dakota 192 154,526 $149,700 3.4%
Cedar Rapids, Iowa 193 126,921 $119,300 4.2%
Arlington, Texas 194 367,154 $129,600 4.5%
Omaha, Nebraska 195 412,689 $130,700 3.8%
Miramar, Florida 196 121,447 $184,300 5.9%
Costa Mesa, California 197 110,322 $623,800 4.5%
Charleston, South Carolina 198 120,903 $212,400 3.7%
Midland, Texas 199 112,618 $202,300 2.3%
San Jose, California 200 954,379 $646,100 5.9%
Fargo, North Dakota 201 106,005 $162,000 2.4%
Austin, Texas 202 799,939 $229,700 3.5%
Manchester, New Hampshire 203 109,786 $178,500 4.6%
Thornton, Colorado 204 118,747 $213,000 5.5%
Chesapeake, Virginia 205 223,233 $227,000 4.6%
Lincoln, Nebraska 206 259,218 $131,600 2.9%
Sterling Heights, Michigan 207 129,887 $148,900 5.8%
Elk Grove, California 208 151,639 $302,700 5.7%
Seattle, Washington 209 612,916 $429,400 4.0%
Boston, Massachusetts 210 619,662 $407,600 5.2%
Corona, California 211 153,644 $410,900 6.1%
Carlsbad, California 212 105,097 $652,000 3.9%
Westminster, Colorado 213 106,750 $220,900 5.2%
Irvine, California 214 213,880 $751,100 3.7%
Thousand Oaks, California 215 126,570 $630,900 4.7%
West Jordan, Utah 216 103,846 $212,300 3.0%
Jersey City, New Jersey 217 248,435 $304,000 7.2%
San Francisco, California 218 807,755 $875,100 4.4%
Rochester, Minnesota 219 106,903 $160,500 3.8%
Rancho Cucamonga, California 220 165,775 $405,600 5.4%
Huntington Beach, California 221 191,403 $681,900 4.1%
Chandler, Arizona 222 237,456 $235,400 4.5%
Orange, California 223 136,891 $543,300 4.6%
Honolulu, Hawaii 224 341,727 $575,400 3.8%
Fremont, California 225 215,188 $687,400 4.1%
Simi Valley, California 226 123,942 $460,200 5.0%
Madison, Wisconsin 227 234,586 $217,400 3.7%
Arvada, Colorado 228 106,965 $237,900 5.1%
Ann Arbor, Michigan 229 114,725 $229,900 5.2%
Sunnyvale, California 230 141,123 $944,300 4.5%
Yonkers, New York 230 196,459 $381,300 5.7%
Virginia Beach, Virginia 232 439,528 $232,400 4.5%
Santa Clara, California 233 116,301 $726,900 4.8%
Pembroke Pines, Florida 234 155,578 $196,500 4.5%
Torrance, California 235 145,443 $661,500 3.7%
Stamford, Connecticut 236 122,878 $439,900 5.5%
Gilbert, Arizona 237 208,850 $249,900 4.2%
Santa Clarita, California 238 175,922 $395,200 4.6%
Carrollton, Texas 239 120,727 $172,800 4.5%
Mckinney, Texas 240 131,882 $231,000 4.4%
Cary, North Carolina 241 136,627 $271,700 3.6%
Olathe, Kansas 242 125,902 $215,100 3.9%
Overland Park, Kansas 243 174,503 $258,400 4.2%
Coral Springs, Florida 244 122,219 $257,900 4.3%
Round Rock, Texas 245 100,764 $186,900 4.0%
Frisco, Texas 246 116,944 $320,500 3.8%
Naperville, Illinois 247 142,143 $350,000 5.7%
Bellevue, Washington 248 122,873 $554,300 3.9%
Plano, Texas 249 263,122 $249,200 4.3%
Alexandria, Virginia 250 140,337 $444,200 3.6%

Like RoadSnacks on Facebook:

 Worst 

Facebook Discussion

comments

21 thoughts on “These Are The 10 Worst Places To Live In America

  1. Over and over again they say that science doesn’t measure things like how nice people are, that it measures fact. Listen, science measures people’s feeling and attitudes all the time. The author’s clearly don’t understand “science”. Also, using median income as a happyness measure in a college town ia just flat out an errror. Why is the tone of this so snotty??

  2. I left Macon over 35 years ago. Best decision I ever made. I’m so much better for it. My lite was going no where. I couldn’t find a job that paid well. The people I left behind wish they had gone with me. I have a BSW degree and retired with Over 20 years in the military. I am happy where I am located now. When I visit Macon I see it worse. The house I sold several years ago 30K is still standing could have gotten much more for it here. Sorry but I am so blessed to have seen that leaving would be beneficial to me in 1979. It was the circumstances that forced me to leave. Now I can say thanks to the Crisis. It made me better.

  3. This is comical. The “science” of this article has holes in it that can be seen by even those of us who do not put all our thought into scientific criteria. It does not seem that making an assumption that using the criteria for coming up with best cities in reverse would be accurate. Things don’t work that way. To use criteria such as low home prices…mmm? Is this saying cities with high home prices are the best to live in? There is some reversal logic not making sense already. I know I have never used high home prices as a positive for moving to a city.

  4. Macon is a beautiful city with great potential for growth and prosperity. It is not the city itself that makes it one of the worst cities in which to live, but the dumbass people who manage the city and the fucking lazy ass no good criminals that gives it such a bad reputation. There are places much worse in the country!!! Get your facts straight before you publish such poorly substantiated articles.

  5. This article and the statistics are crap. I would think Detroit would be number one, but none of the other cities shouldn’t even be on the list. Not enough variables built in to this study.

  6. Savannah is a crappy place to live because of the stupid southern local people that grew up here. Women like to visit, but very very few decent white ones live here. Black people are very racist, and red necks are as stupid as can be. Jobs? If you’re a queer lawyer you’re good, but not so good for the rest of the folks. Crime is bad, and income is low. So come and visit, but don’t settle down here.

  7. When you think about it this is really a review of these cities from the bottom up. So yeah if you are unfortunate to be poor or even lower middle class in any of these places it really can be depressing. However, if you are fortunate enough to be reasonably affluent in these same locations that money can go a long way and make life pretty good. You know, the kind of lifestyle that people like to read about it Garden & Gun. The public schools in the upscale suburbs outside these cities can actually be pretty good (and if you have money to burn there are always the established private schools). There are no hour plus commutes to and from work in bumper to bumper traffic. Also with the cost of living so low in these places a lot of folks have the means to actually travel somewhere nice for family vacations. It all depends on whether your glass is half-full or half-empty.

  8. Suggesting dollars spent for education is the only criteria and validation for ‘good education’ is flawed, unscientific logic. It could be just as likely that cities that throw dollars at the education issues they have, have those issues because of inefficiency. More money doesn’t necessarily guarantee better results.

    Also saying: “you can’t argue with the data” in no less that two places in the article points to weak research. If anything, it calls it more into question.

    Lastly, with no northeast cities in the ‘worst’ list (Detroit being the Midwest) it suggests a bias from the writer; especially with the chronic and rampant opiate abuse that is so prevalent there. Heroin addiction and the crime it brings wasn’t a metric? Low population density IS a negative metric? What is the writer smoking? It’s a very thin justification to suggest more people crammed into an area is a ‘good’ thing. That’s a real stretch and so is the suggestion that affordable housing is a sign of negative circumstances. Lower household income balanced with lower cost of housing is a positive (or at least a neutral) factor. Bubble gum writing to draw clicks. Nothing more.

  9. Mobile has a certain magic that keeps you on your toes. Where a melting pot of people, flavors, cultures and traditions become one voice to lead all of life’s celebrations. Join the jubilee and welcome every day with an enduring passion and a little soulful hospitality, because life is the ultimate gift. This is the spirit of living. This is what we’re born to do.
    Funky, feisty, festive. Or historic, hip and happening. Colorful, cool and cultured. You can call this coastal town a lot of things when you have a vibrant 300 year history with lots of stories to tell and long-standing traditions celebrated on a regular basis. Once called the Paris of the South, Mobile has long been the cultural center of the Gulf Coast and you’ll find an authentic experience found nowhere else in the southern United States.
    Home to America’s original Mardi Gras that rolls through the streets of our historic downtown; dozens of festivals, art shows, or culinary cook-offs nearly every weekend, Mobile takes having fun pretty seriously. If you’re looking for a bit more leisurely experience, nearby historic neighborhoods lined with giant live oaks trees or a paddle in one of the most significant river delta systems in the country are just minutes from downtown.

  10. I lived in Springfield for 18 years and was never robbed once. It’s not even close to dangerous, it’s factored in because of the lower population ratio.

  11. I’m pretty sure all this site is about is bashing the South.
    Very bad science at that.
    I would even be willing to bet they haven’t been to any of the cities they trash. Just some moron a thousand miles away sitting in a cubicle staring at his phone all day.
    But hey, a Southern Man don’t need them around anyhow.

  12. The cities in central California are less bad than midwest cities?
    I have lived and worked in both areas and can tell you first hand Central California is a hot dusty drug infested crime ridden war zone, oh then there are the Tule fogs when make winter driving really interesting: 50 car pile ups any one?
    Stockton had to downgrade its ER status because it was overwhelmed by the number of trauma cases being dumped at its door way. Bakersfield is almost as bad, Modesto is boring and dangerous, Fresno is turning into a free fire zone. As for SF, it is OK if you are gay, have absurd amounts of money, and do not mind stepping over the piles of human excrement on the side walk and panhandlers who verge on being strong arm robber.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *